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Thursday, February 19, 2015

Stranger than Fiction


Did you know that in 1919 in Boston, 21 people were killed by a flood . . . of molasses?

It's become known as the Great Molasses Flood of 1919.
Almost a century ago, a giant storage tank in Boston’s North End ruptured, releasing a massive wave of molasses that killed 21 people, crushed buildings, and tore a firehouse from its foundation.
The Great Molasses Flood of 1919, one of history’s most bizarre disasters, has remained a topic of grim fascination ever since, prompting a range of historical analysis. Now, a study has shed new light on the cause of the collapse, finding that the tank was stressed well beyond capacity and made from a steel susceptible to fracture — the same type used on the Titanic.
Absolutely fascinating.  Check out the whole story here, along with some incredible pictures.


2 comments:

SJHoneywell said...

There's also a classic story from The Onion based on this disaster:

http://www.theonion.com/articles/puddingfactory-disaster-brings-slow-creamy-death-t,621/

Ipecac said...

I'd never seen that. Funny.