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Sunday, September 04, 2016

Mother Teresa


On this day that Mother Teresa became a Saint of the Catholic Church, let's remind ourselves why she wasn't one.
Although she had 517 missions in 100 countries at the time of her death, the study found that hardly anyone who came seeking medical care found it there. Doctors observed unhygienic, “even unfit,” conditions, inadequate food, and no painkillers — not for lack of funding, in which Mother Theresa’s world-famous order was swimming, but what the study authors call her “particular conception of suffering and death.”  Mother Teresa Was No Saint
Mother Teresa’s organization received and receives extensive donations which would enable them to transform the homes for the dying into modern, clean hospices that provide a decent level of palliative care. Mother Teresa was not, however, interested in mitigating suffering so much as celebrating it. As such she concentrated on opening new Missionaries of Charity convents and homes in many different locations around the world as opposed to channeling its extensive funds into their existing homes for the benefit of the people they claimed to be trying to help.  10 Misconceptions about Mother Teresa; She was no Saint

Hitchens’s critiques of Mother Teresa may come across as polemical, but it’s far from the only criticism. British medical journal the Lancet published a critical account of the care in Mother Teresa’s facilities in 1994, and an academic Canadian study from a couple of years ago found fault with “her rather dubious way of caring for the sick, her questionable political contacts, her suspicious management of the enormous sums of money she received, and her overly dogmatic views regarding, in particular, abortion, contraception, and divorce.” Multiple accounts say that Mother Teresa’s nuns would baptise the dying and that she had a reputation for proselytising. Chatterjee also published his own extremely critical book on Mother Teresa in 2003.  Mother Teresa: Why the Catholic missionary is still no saint to her critics
It wasn’t just a select few cynical journalists who criticized Mother Teresa’s hospice care, either. In her hospice care centers, Mother Teresa practiced her belief that patients only needed to feel wanted and die at peace with God — not receive proper medical care — and medical experts went after her for it. In 1994, the British medical journal The Lancet claimed that medicine was scarce in her hospice centers and that patients received nothing close to what they needed to relieve their pain.  Why On Earth Is The Catholic Church Making Mother Teresa A Saint?
“There is something beautiful in seeing the poor accept their lot, to suffer it like Christ’s Passion,” Mother Teresa said. “The world gains much from their suffering.”

That right there is some pure evil.


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